Gollings at Monash

Greg Neville,  John Gollings exhibition, 2017

Monash Gallery of Art, “the Australian home of photography,” has a retrospective exhibition of the work of John Gollings, our premier architectural photographer. 

“The History of the Built World is the first major survey of Golling’s photographic practice, and offers a much anticipated opportunity to appreciate the full breadth of his unique photographic vision.”

It may seem a stretch to call it the history of the built world, but his subjects go back to aboriginal interventions in the environment of 28000 years ago      – see photo above – and include ancient Indian structures and other antiquities along the way to contemporary architecture by Frank Gehry and others.

Golling’s approach has been consistent throughout his half-century career, to interpret a building’s structure and explain it in its own place and context. As a trained architect he understands design and form. The exhibition presents his photography as an illustrative craft, always in service to the client and the subject.

Gollings is also a spectacular entertainer. His vital images radiate energy and he employs every trick to achieve it: ultra-wide lenses to stretch space, natural and artificial light for colour gloss, and shameless vignetting to focus the eye on the glowing subject at the centre. In a sense, he combines the instincts of a Pictorialist – to make the picture and its subject an aesthetic object, and a modernist – to  express the building’s deep structure. He is one of our indispensible photographic artists.

John Gollings:  The history of the built world runs until March 4, 2018 at Monash Gallery of Art.

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Caesarea light

caesarea-1    Caesarea, on the Mediterranean coast of Israel, is the ruin of a Roman-era port city built by the Jewish king Herod just before the time of Christ.

It became an administrative center of the Roman Empire, then the capital     of a Byzantine province, then an Arab city, a Crusader port, a Bosnian Moslem fishing town and finally an Israeli kibbutz. No wonder it’s a ruin.

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caesarea-3//   .   caesarea-2caesarea-13caesarea-9

Photographs by Greg Neville, 2016

Harry Nankin’s workshops

Of-Great-Western-Tears-2-diptych-2006                         Harry Nankin, The Rain/Quadrat 1, 2005

The esteemed Melbourne photo media artist Harry Nankin will be running photography workshops  from his studio and darkroom in Montmorency next year. They will cover introductory analogue (traditional) photography through to advanced sessions on the philosophy of environmental art. They will range from one to four day sessions.

 Harry has long experience as a photographer and environmental artist. He started in the 1980s as a realist photographer of the natural environment, inspired in part by Peter Dombrovskis who’s wilderness photography played such a part in saving Tasmania’s Franklin River. Harry’s pristine large format photography can be seen here on his website.
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Harry once told me that he moved on to his giant immersive photograms of forests and waves because he wanted to have pictures made by nature not of nature. These ambitious projects require planning and special funding plus  teams of assistants but they result in artworks of great beauty and strangeness. They have have been exhibited extensively both here and overseas.
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The workshops, which are explained here, will run from April to May 2016 on the following topics:
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The Camera and the Darkroom, introducing traditional gelatin silver camera and darkroom craft.
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The Plasticity of Silver, on the traditional art of development controls, toning, reduction and intensification of silver materials.
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The Remarkable View Camera, on large format ‘view camera’ craft.
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Art and Ecology, on thinking and making environmental art.
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Harry teaching at Kinglake

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